The Plane Truth

May 01, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

Radiation, Anyone?Radiation, Anyone?At the Pacific Coast Air Museum, Sonoma County. Photographing flowers? A definite "Yes!" Photographing planes? Not so much.

I visited the Pacific Coast Air Museum at the Charles M. Schulz - Sonoma County Airport in Santa Rosa the other day. My hat's off to the dedicated and enthusiastic volunteers who care a great deal about the backstory of each flying machine in the collection. I, however, was there to kill a few hours between appointments and am not much of a history buff to begin with, much less aviation history. Specifically, military aviation history. I looked at the planes with an eye toward line and form, framing shots that probably broke every rule of aviation photography. Forgive me. I like pretty shapes. 

To the PointTo the PointAn F-15 Eagle, referred to as "The First Responder," as it was the first on scene of the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center towers. At the Pacific Coast Air Museum, Sonoma County. So while a volunteer happily related the stories behind the aircraft laid out before me, I snapped away at odd bits and pieces, saying "Uh-huh," and "Oh, my," at appropriate intervals. Truth is, I learned a lot, whether I wanted to or not. And shooting such an unusual subject, besides being a stretch, was fun. For about an hour. 

Slick ChickSlick ChickVintage pinup girl from the fuselage of a military plane, Pacific Coast Air Museum, Sonoma County.

VikingVikingTail art on U.S. military jet, Pacific Coast Air Museum, Sonoma County.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DiamondsThe Vietnam EraAn Army UH-1H Iroquois, known popularly as "Huey," painted up with the name of a Beatles tune. Staring Down the BarrelStaring Down the BarrelWeaponry on U.S. military jet, Pacific Coast Air Museum, Sonoma County.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

History was everywhere -- from the Vietnam-era Huey dubbed "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" to the F-15 Eagle (above), which was the first U.S. military aircraft on the scene of the 9/11/2001 World Trade Center attack. 

I decided I wanted to get a head-on close-up of Navy F-4C Phantom with my wide-angle lens, which is what I shot everything here with (too darn lazy to pull out the tele). I was surprised when I got home and reviewed the images, that a single Phillips-head screw seemed to be holding the whole shebang together. (Well, not really, I realize, but it was a surprise to see that screw on the tip of the nose.) What, exactly, is it holding together?

~ glo

PhillipsPhillipsA Phillips-head screw on the nose of an F-4C Phantom, Pacific Coast Air Museum, Sonoma County.

 

 


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